PYANGONG: North Korea has hailed as a success its latest test of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), describing it as a "stern warning" for the US.

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un said the test proved that the entire US was within striking range, state media reported. The launch came three weeks after North Korea's first ICBM test.

US President Donald Trump called it "only the latest reckless and dangerous action by the North Korean regime".

China also condemned the missile test but urged "all parties concerned" to exercise restraint "and avoid intensifying tensions".

Confirming the launch, the North said the ICBM flew for just over 47 minutes and reached an altitude of 3,724km (2,300 miles).

It said the launch had "successfully tested re-entry capabilities" of the missile.
"The leader said proudly the test also confirmed all the US mainland is within our striking range," the Korean Central News Agency said.

The statement said that the rocket was a Hwasong-14, the same model North Korea tested on 3 July.

North Korea's latest ICBM test went farther and higher than their previous 3 July test, meaning that they may be able to strike even deeper into the heartland of the United States than initially assessed.

Within minutes of the launch, South Korean, Japanese and US officials reported data about the location, range, apogee, and flight time of the missile. While full analysis has not been finalised yet, several points stand out.

First, the data available indicates that the missile may have a range of approximately 10,400km. Since this missile is road-mobile, a launch from the north-eastern city of Rason would put New York City in range of the ICBM.

Second, the US reported that North Korea launched the ICBM from Mupyong-ni, North Korea. This location was different from many press accounts leading up to the launch which predicted a Kusong launch. The missile launched at 23:11 local time, an unusual time for North Korea's tests as well. It is possible that North Korea is already experimenting with deploying the missile under the cover of night or setting up multiple launch sites to confuse observers.