‘Dementia is unavoidable with advancing age’: This and other myths around Dementia busted

133

Dementia is a syndrome which is used to denote several symptoms like lack of memory, thinking, orientation, comprehension, calculation, learning capacity, language, and judgement. The incidence of dementia is alarmingly high. While 55 million people, as per the WHO estimates, are currently living with dementia nearly 10 million new cases are being reported every year. One of the most common forms of dementia which accounts for 60-70% of the cases is Alzheimer’s disease.

Like every other mental health issue, this is also highly misunderstood. There are several myths associated with dementia, which are massively circulated and believed so much that the right information related to this disease gets buried under the misinformation.

Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to manage dementia and only the right information can be a saviour in this.

Though it is reported mostly in people above 65 years of age, the occurrence of dementia is not age dependent. Age is the biggest risk factor for dementia, but dementia does not exclusively affect only older people.

As per the WHO records, young onset dementia accounts for 9% of the total cases. Lifestyle habits contribute a lot to the early onset of dementia.

Though there is no treatment available for dementia, people can lower the risk of the symptoms.

The various symptoms associated with dementia can be lowered if the disease is spotted early and proper medical assistance is provided to the patient.

Dementia is referred to as the condition that includes a number of symptoms and mental health issues including Alzheimer’. So the fact is dementia and Alzheimer’s are not the same. Alzheimer’s is a form of dementia just like Lewy body disease, Huntington disease, Parkinson’s disease, etc.

Dementia is referred to as the condition that includes a number of symptoms and mental health issues including Alzheimer’. So the fact is dementia and Alzheimer’s are not the same. Alzheimer’s is a form of dementia just like Lewy body disease, Huntington disease, Parkinson’s disease, etc.

This is partially correct. Not all forms of dementia are inherited from one generation to another. If one member of a family has dementia it might increase the risk of having it but it won’t guarantee it.

No! While people have always associated mental health complications with violence, the underlying problem is lack of care and support.

When a person develops mental health issues, the ability to convey the feelings to others decreases gradually.

As a result of which these people get frustrated for not being understood properly. This is what leads to violent behaviour.

It is believed that cooking in an aluminium pot can lead to dementia. However, no research study has backed this claim so far.